Glaser, Donald A.

Signed 1955 Scientific American reprint, "The Bubble Chamber" signed by author Donald A. Glaser, 1960 Nobel Physics laureate, on cover

Price: $65.00

Description:
(1926-2013) Ohio-born US physicist and neurobiologist, won 1960 Nobel Prize in Physics for inventing the bubble chamber in subatomic particle physics, which allowed scientists to observe what happens to high-energy beams from an accelerator, paving the way for many important discoveries. BS in physics and mathematics from the Case School of Applied Science 1946, Ph.D. in physics from CalTech 1949. His interest in particle physics led him to work with Nobel laureate Carl David Anderson studying cosmic rays with cloud chambers. He preferred the accessibility of cosmic ray research over nuclear physics. At Caltech he learned to design and build the equipment he needed for his experiments which proved useful throughout his career and attended molecular genetics seminars led by Nobel laureate Max Delbruck; he would return to this field later. He became an instructor at U. Michigan 1949 (his doctoral thesis, "The Momentum Distribution of Charged Cosmic Ray Particles Near Sea Level"), promoted to professor 1957. While teaching at Michigan, Glaser began work on experiments that led to the creation of the bubble chamber. His experience with cloud chambers at Caltech had shown him that they were inadequate for studying elementary particles. In a cloud chamber, particles pass though gas and collide with metal plates that obscure the scientists' view of the event. The cloud chamber also needs time to reset between recording events and cannot keep up with accelerators' rate of particle production. He experimented with using superheated liquid in a glass chamber. Charged particles would leave a track of bubbles as they passed through the liquid, and their tracks could be photographed. He created the 1st bubble chamber with ether and experimented with hydrogen while visiting the University of Chicago, showing that it would also work in the chamber. His new invention was ideal for use with high-energy accelerators, so he traveled to Brookhaven National Laboratory to study elementary particles using the accelerator there. The images created with his bubble chamber brought recognition of the importance of his device, and he was able to get funding to continue experimenting with larger chambers. Glaser was then recruited by Nobel laureate Luis Alvarez who was working on a hydrogen bubble chamber at the UCal Berkeley. In 1959 he went to UCal Berkeley as a Professor of Physics. During this time his research concerned short-lived elementary particles. The bubble chamber enabled him to observe the paths and lifetimes of the particles. From 1962, Glaser changed his field of research to molecular biology, starting with a project on ultraviolet-induced cancer. In 1964, he was given the additional title of Professor of Molecular Biology and from 1989 he was Professor of Physics and Neurobiology in the Graduate School. 6pp printed 11 x 8 1/2 article "The Bubble Chamber" by Glaser, reprinted from Scientific American, February 1955, vol. 192 no. 2, pp 46-50, signed by Glaser on the front cover.

Condition: Very good
Type:Signed Brochure






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