Yukawa, Hideki

1963 US stamp First Day Cover signed by the 1949 Nobel laureate in physics, 1st Japanese Nobel Prize recipient!

Price: $110.00

Description:
(1907-1981) Japanese theoretical physicist, 1st Japanese Nobel laureate. Born Hideki Ogawa in Tokyo, grew up in Kyoto. Ogawa decided against becoming a mathematician in high school; his teacher marked his exam answer as incorrect when Ogawa proved a theorem but in a different manner than the teacher expected. He decided against a career in experimental physics in college when he demonstrated clumsiness in glassblowing, a requirement for experiments in spectroscopy. In 1929, after receiving his degree from Kyoto Imperial University, he stayed on as a lecturer for 4 years. After graduation, he was interested in theoretical physics, particularly in the theory of elementary particles. In 1932, he married Sumi Yukawa. In accordance with Japanese customs of the time, since he came from a family with many sons but his father-in-law had none, he was adopted by him and changed his family name from Ogawa to Yukawa. In 1933 he became an assistant professor at [Osaka University], at 26. In 1935 he published his theory of mesons, which explained the interaction between protons and neutrons and was a major influence on research into elementary particles. In 1940 he became a professor in Kyoto University and won the Imperial Prize of the Japan Academy, and in 1943 the Decoration of Cultural Merit from the Japanese government. In 1949 he became a professor at Columbia University, the same year he received the Nobel Prize in Physics, after the discovery by Cecil Frank Powell, Giuseppi Occhialini, and Cesar Lattes of Yukawa's predicted pi meson in 1947. Yukawa also worked on the theory of K-capture, in which a low energy electron is absorbed by the nucleus, after its initial prediction by G. C. Wick. He became 1st Chairman of Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics in 1953. He was an editor of "Progress of Theoretical Physics" and published the books "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics" (1946) and "Introduction to the Theory of Elementary Particles" (1948). In 1955, he joined ten other leading scientists and intellectuals in signing the Russell-Einstein Manifesto calling for nuclear disarmament. Uncommon 1963 US 5c National Academy of Sciences Centennial stamp with "First Day of Issue" cancellation on 3 3/4 x 6 1/2commemorative envelope postmarked Washington DC, October 14 1963, signed by Yukawa in English.

Condition: Very good, faint rust clip remnant at top left
Type:Signed Cover






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