Jackson, William

Rare ADS of the secretary to the Constitutional Convention and "40th signer" of the US Constitution, while aide to Gen. Benj. Lincoln in 1781!

Price: $1750.00

Description:
(1759-1828) English-born Secretary to the Constitutional Convention, served with distinction in the Continental Army and after the war was one of President Washington's personal secretaries. Sent to Charleston after the death of his parents, when war broke out in 1775, he obtained a position as a cadet in the 1st So. Carolina Regiment, 2nd lieutenant May 1776. Jackson saw action near Charleston in June 1776 at Fort Sullivan. Late in 1777, he was part of the disastrous expedition against St. Augustine in British East Florida, returning to So. Carolina in 1778. Southern regiments were placed under the command of Major-General Benjamin Lincoln from Massachusetts. Chas. C. Pinckney convinced Lincoln to choose Jackson as an aide to assist him in relating to his Southern troops and Jackson was temporarily promoted to major. As Lincoln's aide he saw action at Stono Ferry and the 1779 Siege of Savannah. In 1780 Lincoln surrendered after the Siege of Charleston. Jackson was shipped to British-held Philadelphia and after a few months was returned to the Continental Army in a prisoner exchange. He was then assigned to General Washington's staff as secretary to the general's aide John Laurens, son of Henry Laurens. When Laurens went to France in 1781 to buy supplies with French loans, Jackson went along, given the job when Laurens returned home. He made extensive purchases beyond his budget and had a discussion with Benjamin Franklin after spending some money Franklin had reserved for unpaid bills. He returned home in Feb. 1782, and was Asst. Secretary of War to Benj. Lincoln and helped settle the 1783 Pennsylvania Mutiny. In Oct. 1783, he resigned to be Robert Morris' agent in England. On his 1784 return, he studied law in Philadelphia. In 1787, Jackson applied to Washington to be secretary to the Philadelphia Convention. On its 1st day of business, May 25, 1787, Hamilton nominated Jackson to the post, and the delegates chose him over Franklin's grandson. As Convention secretary, he maintained secrecy of the proceedings, kept official minutes, and destroyed many of the proceedings' other records. He signed the document "Attest William Jackson Secretary" to be the Constitution's 40th signer. He went to the Confederation Congress in NYC and read the Constitution out to the Congress days after the signing, on Sept. 20, 1787. He was personal secretary to President Washington, resigning in 1791 to restart his law practice. In Jan. 1796, Washington, appointed Jackson Collector for the Port of Philadelphia; Jefferson dismissed him in 1801 for politicizing his office. He started a Federalist newspaper in Philadelphia and edited it until 1815. Jackson succeeded Henry Knox as Secretary General of the Society of the Cincinnati 1799-1828 and headed an unsuccessful effort to lobby Congress to grant veteran Revolutionary officers half-pay for life in 1818. His last public appearance was welcoming the Marquis de Lafayette to Philadelphia in 1824. Rare ADS to Major General (Benjamin) Lincoln, no place (So. Carolina), February 7 1781 (war date), 8 x 6 1/2 accounting for monies owed him for a share of a purchased carriage and for household expenses in Carolina; at bottom he notes receipt of payment in full. A second signature of his in the body, docketed (unsigned but in his hand) by General Lincoln on verso. BENJAMIN LINCOLN (1733-1810) American army officer, a Continental Army major general major general in the Revolutionary War. He was involved in 3 major surrenders during the war: at Saratoga (wounded shortly afterward) he contributed to Burgoyne's surrender of the British Army; he oversaw the largest American surrender of the war at Charleston in 1780; and, as Washington's 2nd in command, formally accepted the British surrender at Yorktown. Later active in Massachusetts politics, served as 1st US Secretary of War 1781-83. In 1787, Lincoln led a militia army to suppress Shay's Rebellion, and was a strong supporter of the new US Constitution. He was for many years Port of Boston customs collector.

Condition: Very good, paper slightly uneven at bottom not afffecting content of signature
Type:Document






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