Roosevelt, Eleanor (ON HOLD)

The First Lady congratulates an Arizona woman on the success of a Democratic Women's Day Drive

Price: $350.00

Description:
(1884-1962) American politician, diplomat and activist, longest-serving US First Lady 1933-45. She served as US Delegate to the UN General Assembly 1945-52. President Truman later called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute to her human rights achievements. A niece of President Theodore Roosevelt, she had an unhappy childhood, losing both parents and a brother at a young age. She married her 5th cousin once removed, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, in 1905. Their marriage was complicated from the beginning by Franklin's controlling mother, and after Eleanor discovered her husband's relationship with Lucy Mercer in 1918, she resolved to seek fulfillment in a public life of her own. She persuaded FDR to stay in politics after he was stricken with polio in 1921. Following his 1928 election as NY Governor and throughout the remainder of his public career she regularly made public appearances on his behalf, and as First Lady, she significantly reshaped and redefined the role of that office. Though widely respected in her later years, Roosevelt was a controversial First Lady for her outspokenness, particularly her stance on racial issues. She was the first presidential spouse to hold regular press conferences, write a daily newspaper column, write a monthly magazine column, host a weekly radio show, and speak at a national party convention. She advocated for expanded roles for women in the workplace, civil rights for African Americans and Asian Americans, and the rights of WW II refugees. After FDR's 1945 death, she remained active in politics for the remaining 17 years of her life. She pressed the United States to join and support the United Nations and became its first delegate. She served as the first chair of the UN Commission on Human Rights and oversaw the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human rights. Later she chaired JFK's Presidential Commission on the Status of Women. By her death, Eleanor Roosevelt was regarded as one of the most esteemed women in the world. TLS on gilt "The White House/Washington" 9 1/4 x 6 1/4 letterhead, Hyde Park, NY, August 19 1941, to a Mrs. Stuart. Mrs. Roosevelt is delighted to hear that "Arizona has gone over the top in the Democratic Women's Day Drive." The success of the drive is gratifying and indicates "the interest of women in raising money to continue the educational work of the [Democratic Party] Women's Division". She sends congratulations and good wishes to Mrs. Stuart and the women who have worked with her on the drive.

Condition: Very good
Type:Letter






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