Colfax, Schuyler

Lovely 1870 ALS as VP, letter of sympathy on a colleague and friend's bereavement

Price: $295.00

Description:
(1823-1885) Indiana US Rep 1855-69, Speaker of the House of Representatives 1863-69, 17th US Vice President 1869–1873. New York City-born, attended school until age 10, at 13 moved with his mother and stepfather to Indiana. As a young man, Colfax contributed articles on Indiana politics to the “New York Tribune” and formed a friendship with editor Horace Greeley. At 19 he became editor of the pro-Whig “South Bend Free Press” and in 1845, he bought the newspaper and changed its name to the “St. Joseph Valley Register”. He ran the paper for 9 years, and wrote editorials in support of Whig and later, Republican views. He was a delegate to the 1848 Whig Convention and the 1849 & 1850 Indiana constitutional conventions. Colfax was elected to Congress in 1854 opposing the Kansas-Nebraska Act. When the Whig Party collapsed completely, he joined the new Republican Party, and after the Republicans gained a majority in the House of Representatives in 1858, he became chairman of the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads. A strong opponent of slavery, his speech attacking the pro-slavery Lecompton Legislature in Kansas was the most widely requested Republican campaign document in the election. In 1862, he was elected House Speaker and announced passage of the 13th Amendment in 1865. In 1868, he was elected Vice President on the ticket with Ulysses S. Grant, and served 1869-73. He was not renominated in 1872, replaced by Mass. US Senator Henry Wilson. He had been involved in the Crédit Mobilier of America scandal and left office under a cloud. In 1865, Colfax, author Samuel Bowles, and Ill. Lt. Gov. Wm. Bross, set out for the California coast and recorded their experiences in the 1869 book, “Our New West”. After leaving office, Colfax embarked on a successful career as a lecturer. ALS on 8 x 5 lined engraved "Vice President's Chamber,/Washington" letterhead, May 29 1870, to his unnamed "afflicted friend" whose loss he read about in the morning newspapers. He expresses his whole-hearted sympathy "at this afflicting bereavement" but could not refrain from writing to express the sympathies of Colfax's household. He adds: "God grant that the same shadow may not cast its gloom over us." Getting, however, to business, Colfax has telegraphed and written about "the Army Conference...only on the urgent promptings of others, & because I wished you should be on it, unless your absence was to be a prolonged one." Colfax asks pardon if he has annoyed him "& consider them all as if never sent." With portrait.

Condition: Very good
Type:Letter






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