Hendricks, Thomas A.

1872 ALS by the 1876 Democratic VP candidate, died in 1885 after 8 1/2 months as Cleveland’s VP

Price: $195.00

Description:
(1819-1885) Indiana lawyer and politician, Indiana US Rep 1851-55, General Land Office Commissioner 1855-59, US Senator 1863-69, Governor 1873-77, US Vice President 1885. A popular fiscally conservative Democrat known for his honesty and adherence to the Constitution, he defended the Democratic position in the Senate during the Civil War and Reconstruction, voting against the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution. He opposed Radical Reconstruction and President Johnson's removal following his impeachment in the House of Representatives. Admitted to the Indiana bar 1843, began law practice in Shelbyville, to Indianapolis 1860. His law firm was one of the state's leading law firms. He ran for governor 3 times, won only once in 1872 by a margin of 1,148 votes. Hendricks was Democratic candidate for US Vice president with NY governor Samuel Tilden in the controversial 1876 presidential election. Although they won the popular vote, Tilden and Hendricks lost the election by one vote in the Electoral College to Republican R. B. Hayes and his running mate, William A. Wheeler. Despite poor health, Hendricks accepted his party's nomination for VP in 1884 as Grover Cleveland's running mate. They won the election, but Hendricks only served as VP from March 4 until his death on Nov. 25, 1885. ALS, 2pps (1st & 2nd pps of 10 x 7 3/4folded sheet), unsigned postscript on 3rd page, Indianapolis, January 16 1872, to Judge (Henry R.) Selden. Lawyer Hendricks suggests that in the case of Swook against the directors of the Water Works Co., it is important that Selden and Mr. Woodruff give testimony as to the value of the Canal and appurtenances at the time conveyed to the Company, what he then regarded its worth and what he now regards it's worth, etc. Notices have been served to take depositions at Auburn (NY) which Hendricks sends, and asks Selden to go to Auburn and attend the taking of depositions and to give his own. Good legal content to Susan B. Anthony's future lawyer that year. HENRY R. SELDEN (1805-1885) Connecticut-born NY lawyer and politician, Lieut. Governor of NY 1857-58. He defended Susan B. Anthony in her 1873 trial for unlawfully voting as a woman. Moved to Rochester, NY in 1825 to study law with his brother Samuel's firm. Admitted to the bar in 1830, he practiced in Clarkson, NY. His son, George B. Selden, became the 1st person granted a patent for the automobile. Selden became case reporter for the New York State Court of Appeals in 1851. Originally a Democrat, he became an abolitionist and founding member of the NY Republican Party in 1856, elected Lieutenant Governor that year, and was a Delegate to the 1860 GOP Convention. In July 1862, Selden was appointed to the NY Court of Appeals to fill the vacancy caused by his brother Samuel's resignation. In Nov. 1863 he was elected to an 8-year term, but resigned in 1865. He was a member of the State Assembly in 1866. In 1870, he was defeated for election as Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals. In 1872, Selden was a delegate to the national convention of the Liberal Republican Party in Cincinnati. He retired from politics and spent the latter portion of 1872 and the first half of 1873 involved in Anthony’s case, for which he never billed Anthony. He retired from law practice in 1879.

Condition: Very good, 2 mail folds
Type:Letter






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