Tennyson, Alfred, Lord

AQS, 1st quatrain of "Tears, Idle Tears", by Great Britain's longest-serving Poet Laureate

Price: $650.00

Description:
(1809-1892) Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign, one of Britain's most popular poets. He excelled at penning short lyrics, such as "Break, Break, Break", "The charge of the Light Brigade", "Tears, Idle Tears", and "Crossing the Bar." Tennyson also wrote some notable blank verse including "Idylls of the King", "Ulysses" and "Tithonus". A number of phrases from Tennyson's work have become commonplaces of the English language, including "'Tis better to have loved and lost/Than never to have loved at all" and "Theirs not to reason why,/Theirs but to do and die"; He is the 9th most frequently quoted writer in "The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations." He entered Trinity College, Cambridge in 1827, and in 1829, Tennyson was awarded the Chancellor's Gold Medal at Cambridge for one of his first pieces, "Timbuktu". He published his first solo collection of poems in 1830. His verse soon proved popular and brought Tennyson to the attention of well-known writers of the day, including Coleridge. In the spring of 1831, Tennyson's father died, and he left Cambridge before taking his degree. In 1833 Tennyson published his 2nd book of poetry, which met heavy criticism and he did not publish again for 10 years. Tennyson moved to London in 1840 and in 1842, while living modestly in London, Tennyson published the two volume "Poems" which met with immediate success; poems from this collection, such as 'Locksley Hall", "Break, Break, Break", "Ulysses", and a new version of "The Lady of Shalott" met enduring fame. In 1850 Tennyson reached the pinnacle of his career, finally publishing his masterpiece, "In Memoriam A. H. H." Later that year, he was appointed Poet Laureate, succeeding Wordsworth, and after Samuel Rogers' refusal of the post, holding the position until his death. In 1855, Tennyson produced "The Charge of the Light Brigade", his dramatic tribute to the British cavalrymen involved during the Crimean War. He finally accepted a peerage in 1883 at Gladstone's earnest solicitation. In 1884 Victoria created him Baron Tennyson of Aldworth in Sussex and of Freshwater, the Isle of Wight and took his seat in the House of Lords in 1884. He was the first to be raised to a peerage for his writing. Tennyson continued writing into his eighties, at his death buried at Westminster Abbey. AQS on 7 x 4 1/2 dark blue paper, no place, no date (post-1847) in full: "Tears, idle tears, I know not/what they mean,/Tears from the depth of some/divine despair/Rise in the heart, and gather in the eyes,/In looking on the happy autumn/fields,/And thinking of the days that/are no more." Signed "ATennyson" below. “Tears, Idle Tears” is part of a larger poem, “The Princess,” published in 1847. Tennyson wrote “The Princess” to discuss the relationship between the sexes and to provide an argument for women’s rights in higher education. Like so much of Tennyson’s poetry, it evokes complex emotions and moods through a mastery of language. “Tears, Idle Tears,” a particularly evocative section, is one of several interludes of song in the midst of the poem, written in blank verse, or unrhymed iambic pentameter. It consists of 4 5-line stanzas, each of which closes with the words “the days that are no more.” "Tears, Idle Tears" is regarded for the quality of its lyrics.

Condition: Very good, horizontal center fold split repaired with stamp hinge (transparent paper tape with mild gum to adhere stamps to collectors' album pages) on verso, slight residue on recto slightly affects word "autumn", , slight water spot not af
Type:AQS






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