Rogers, Samuel

1847 ANS from the London poet and salonist called "The Banker Poet"

Price: $75.00

Description:
(1763-1855) English poet, one of the most celebrated in his life, his fame eclipsed by Romantic colleagues Wordsworth, Coleridge and Byron. His recollections of these and other friends are key sources for information about London artistic and literary life in which he used his wealth to support. He made his money as a banker and was also a discriminating art collector. Joined his father's banking business in Cornhill, and became interested in English literature, particularly the work of Dr. Johnson, Thomas Gray, and Oliver Goldsmith. He contributed to the "Gentleman's Magazine", and in 1786 published a volume containing some imitations of Goldsmith and an "Ode to Superstition" in the style of Gray. In 1788 Samuel's business responsibilities increased on his elder brother's death. With Gray as his model, Rogers took pains to polish his verses, and 6 years elapsed after the publication of his 1st volume before he printed his elaborate poem, "The Pleasures of Memory" (1792), regarded by some as the last embodiment of 18th century poetic diction. In 1793 his father's death gave Rogers the principal share in the banking house in Cornhill, and a large income. In 1803 he moved to London, where for 50 years he entertained its celebrities. In the mid-19th century, Rogers hosted social breakfasts, then in vogue; an invitation to one was a formal entry into literary society, and his dinners were even more select. His social success was due less to his literary position than to his power as a conversationalist, his educated taste in all matters of art, and to his sarcastic and bitter wit. He reconciled Thomas Moore with Francis Jeffrey and with Byron, relieved Sheridan's difficulties at the end of his life, and obtained Wordsworth's sinecure as distributor of stamps. He was friends with Byron, Wordsworth, and Walter Scott, and opined as to Tennyson's fitness to be Poet Laureate. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1796. His literary production remained slow. "An Epistle to a Friend" (Conversation Sharp), publ. 1798, describes his ideal of a happy life. This was followed by "The Voyage of Columbus" (1810), and by "Jacqueline" (1814), publ. in the same volume with Byron's "Lara". His poem "Human Life" (1819), took him 12 years. In 1821 he returned to Italy, visiting Byron and Shelley in Pisa. An early tour of Italy led to his last and longest work, "Italy", 1st part published anonymously in 1822; the 2nd, with his name attached, in 1828. At first a failure, Rogers enlarged and revised the poem, commissioning illustrations from J. M. W. Turner, Thomas Stothard, and Samuel Prout. These were engraved on steel in the sumptuous edition of 1830 which proved a great success. Rogers followed with another sumptuous edition of "Poems" (1834). In 1850, on Wordsworth's death, he declined to be Poet Laureate on account of his age. For the last 5 years of his life he was confined to his chair and died at 92 in London. ALS to an unknown correspondent on a 4 1/4 x 3 1/2 grey piece, no place, January 4 1847. He writes, in full: "I am so glad that we succeeded, a thousand, thousand thanks for your note. Pray remember me very affectionately to the Cottagers at Sloperton. I have heard much of M. [possibly the poet Thomas Moore] from the Visitors at Bowood & shall write to Him very soon. Yours very sincerely [signed and dated]. My best compts to your sister." Henry, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne (17801863) was Chancellor of the Exchequer at 25. He served as a Whig under 8 PMs, becoming Lord President of the Council and friend and political confidante of Queen Victoria. Like his father, he built an outstanding art collection and entertained friends and colleagues at Bowood, the family Georgian country house adjacent to the village of Derry Hill, halfway between Calne and Chippenham in Wiltshire. His father, the 2nd Earl Sherbourne (PM 1782-83) was created Marquess of Lansdowne for negotiating peace with America after the Revolutionary War, and furnished Bowood with superb collections of paintings and classical sculpture. THOMAS MOORE (1779-1852) Irish poet, singer, songwriter, and entertainer, nicknamed "Anachreon". He is best remembered for the lyrics to "The Minstrel Boy" and "The Last Rose of Summer". He and John Murray burned Lord Byron's memoirs after his death. Moore attended Samuel Whyte's English Grammar School in Dublin where he learned the English accent with which he spoke the rest of his life. In 1795 he graduated from Trinity College in Dublin. He finally settled (and died) in Sloperton Cottage at Bromham and became a novelist and biographer as well as a successful poet.

Condition: Very good
Type:Letter






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