Barr, Joseph W.

1975 TLS from the shortest-serving Treasury Secretary (30 days) to retired Gen. Alfred Gruenther, praising Col. Pete Dawkins, former Army football player & Heisman Trophy winner

Price: $50.00

Description:
(1918-1996) Businessman and politician, Secretary of the Treasury (LBJ) for 30 days, Dec. 21, 1968- Jan. 20, 1969. He served in the Navy 1942-45 on subchaser duty in the Mediterranean and Atlantic, earned a Bronze Star for sinking a submarine off Anzio Beach. He engaged in business in Indiana and was US Rep 1959-61, then assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury for congressional relations, and in 1963 was appointed Chairman of the FDIC. Barr was Undersecretary of the Treasury 1965-68, and upon the resignation of Henry H. Fowler, served the shortest term of any Treasury Secretary, resigning in early 1969. US paper money always depicts the signature of the Secretary of the Treasury; because of his short term, collectors speculated notes with his signature would be scarce. In reality, 458,880,000 $1 notes were printed bearing his signature (none in other denominations), but due to limited lifespan (estimated to last an average of 21 months in circulation) it is unknown how many still exist. Barr was the president and the chairman of American Security and Trust Co. 1969-74 and chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Atlanta 1977-81. TLS “Joe” on 11 x 8 1/2 personal letterhead, Washington, December 10 1975, to General Alfred Gruenther, Washington. Having just returned from Germany as a guest of the German government at a NATO forum, he notes that one delegate was Col. Pete Dawkins, stationed at the Army War College. Barr paints a most warm favorable impression of Dawkins and hopes Gruenther will “pass this on to the appropriate people. With initialed TLS from General Walter T. Kerwin Jr. to Major General DeWitt C. Smith Jr. (“Dee”) sending Barr’s note Kerwin has received from Gruenther, and noting Barr as former Treasury Secretary. Two items, nice associations! ALFRED GRUENTHER ("The Brain", 1899-1983) USMA 1918, Supreme Allied Commander, Europe/Commander-in-Chief, US European Command 1953-56. He was Chief of Staff of the 3rd Army, 5th Army, 15th Army Group, principal US planner of invasions of No. Africa (1942) & Italy (1943). Promoted to temporary Major General, was Deputy Commander, US Forces in Austria 1945. American Red Cross President 1957-64. He took up bridge and became a bridge-playing companion of Eisenhower. Promoted to Deputy Chief of Staff (Brig. Genl. Eisenhower was Chief of Staff) of the 3rd Army, after the US entered WW II, he went to London as chief US planner of the Allied invasion of French No. Africa. Deputy Chief of Staff under Eisenhower, and 5th Army Chief of Staff under Mark Clark, planning the invasion of Italy and later campaigns in the Apennines. When Clark took over 15th Army Group, he remained Clark's Chief of Staff before becoming Deputy Commanding General of US forces in Austria. At War's end, he became National War College Deputy Commandant, Staff Director of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, then Army Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Operations. He got his 4th star in 1951, youngest in history, as NATO HQ Chief of Staff, serving under Eisenhower & Ridgway before taking over as Commander, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers, Europe (SHAPE). PETE DAWKINS (b. 1938) USMA 1958, star West Point football player, military officer, and political candidate. At West Point, he was Brigade Commander, class president, football team captain, and a "Star Man" (top 5% of his class academically). only cadet ever to hold all 4 at once. Playing as a halfback for Army, he won the Heisman Trophy, the Maxwell Award, a consensus 1958 All-American selection. Awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford, he received a doctorate in 1977 from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton, his dissertation “The United States Army and the ‘Other’ War in Vietnam: A Study of the Complexity of Implementing Organizational Change.” After Oxford, he finished Infantry and Ranger School then posted to the 82nd Airborne, receiving 2 Bronze Stars in Vietnam, held commands in the 7th Infantry and 101st Airborne. He led a battalion in Korea 1971-72, was a White House Fellow 1973-74 and worked on a task force to change the Army into an all-volunteer force. During the mid-70s, Col. Dawkins was brigade commander in the 82nd Airborne at Ft. Bragg, then brigade commander in the 101st Airborne at Ft. Campbell. After being 101st Airborne Chief of Staff, promoted to Brig. Genl., retiring 1983 then worked on Wall Street. He ran for the US Senate in New Jersey as a Republican in 1988, losing to Frank Lautenberg. WALTER T. KERWIN JR. (1917-2008) USMA 1939, Commanding General, US Continental Army Command (CG CONARC) 1973; Commanding General, US Army Forces Command (CG FORSCOM) 1973-74; Army Vice Chief of Staff (VCSA) 1974-78. During WW II, fought in No. Africa, Sicily, Italy and France. As Brig. Genl., commanded 3rd Armored Div. Artillery in Germany Aug. 1961. During the 1960s he was Chief of Staff MACV, Commander II Field Force Vietnam, Army Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, and Commanding General of the Continental Army Command, later renamed Forces Command. He championed the “One Army” or “Total Army” concept which recognized the indispensable equal roles of the Army National Guard and Army Reserve with the active Army in defense policy and in preparing for war. Recognized as an innovative artilleryman, he developed a system of massing fires that contributed immeasurably to the success of Allied landings at Anzio. In 1974 he became Army Vice Chief of Staff, during the transition to an all volunteer force and post-Vietnam War restructuring. DeWITT C. SMITH,JR. (1920-1985) US Army officer, former deputy Army Chief of Staff, twice (and longest-serving) Army War College commandant 1974 -77, 1978-80. He was an aide to Chief of Staff Maxwell Taylor, and was a battalion XO and commander in Germany. He served at the Pentagon before going to the Army War College. He led a combat brigade of the 1st Infantry in Vietnam. In 1970, After his stints at the War College, he retired in 1980.

Condition: Very good, binder knocks at right,light wrinkling at top
Type:Letter






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