Carr, Joseph B.

1884 DS as (Republican) New York Secretary of State certifying election of (Democratic) Electors for the Cleveland-Hendricks ticket + engraved electoral ballots

Price: $125.00

Description:
(1828-1895) New York State Union general in the Civil War. While living in Troy, NY, he became interested in military affairs and by 1861 was a New York militia colonel. At the start of the War, he was instrumental in recruitment of the 2nd NY Vol. Infantry Regt., appointed its colonel May 14, 1861. Assigned to Ft. Monroe, Va., he fought at Big Bethel. He was with the Army of the Potomac in the Peninsula Campaign, the Seven Days Battles, and the Northern Virginia Campaign. As a brigade commander in III Corps, General Carr fought at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville (commanding a division during part of the latter after the death of Hiram Berry). He was promoted to brigadier general Sept. 7, 1862 for gallantry at Malvern Hill, but this promotion was plagued by procedural difficulties. His 1st appointment was returned to President Lincoln on Feb. 12, 1863. Carr was reappointed March 30, 1863, but the Senate failed to confirm the commission in the session in which he was nominated and it expired March 30, 1864. He was re-nominated April 9, 1864 and confirmed June 30, date of rank as of March 30, 1863. He was distinguished for gallantry at Gettysburg, where he was wounded and his men stubbornly held their ground near the Peach Orchard. He commanded the 3rd Division, III Corps in autumn 1863 campaigns. Because of difficulties with his brigadier general appointment, technically he was junior to his own subordinate brigade commanders and on May 2, 1864, Grant reassigned him to the Army of the James under Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler. Carr led a division of African-American soldiers in XVIII Corps and briefly commanded the Defenses of Yorktown in the Department of Virginia & North Carolina. On March 13, 1865, Carr was appointed brevet major general of volunteers, mustered out August 24. Carr became a manufacturer and a GOP state politician, serving as New York Secretary of State 1880-85. In 1885, he ran for lieutenant governor but was defeated. Printed 14 x 8 DS signed by Carr as New York Secretary of State, Albany, November 21 1884, gold foil official seal at lower left, certifying election of 36 named presidential electors by the Board of State Canvassers. Although no party name appears on the document, the named Electors would cast the deciding Electoral College votes to give Grover Cleveland and Thomas Hendricks their victory. With 2 x 5 engraved ballots for Cleveland as President and Hendricks as Vice President mounted on a 10 x 7 grey sheet, 3 items. The 1884 presidential election held Tuesday, Nov. 4, saw the 1st election of a Democrat as President since the Civil War, NY Governor Grover Cleveland defeating Republican James G. Blaine of Maine. Cleveland won 48.9% of the popular vote and 219 electoral votes, carrying the South and several key swing states. Blaine won 48.3% of the popular vote and 182 electoral votes. Cleveland won New York by just 1,047 votes; had he lost New York, he would have lost the election. Two 3rd-party candidates each won less than 2% of the popular vote.

Condition: Very good, Carr document with carefully strengthened folds
Type:Document






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