Jackson, Andrew

1825 3rd Person ALS agreeing to dine with friends if wife Rachel’s health will allow him to leave her

Price: $1750.00

Description:
(1767-1845) “Old Hickory”, American soldier-statesman, 7th US President 1829-37. He gained earlier fame as a US Army general and served in both houses of Congress from Tennessee. As president, Jackson sought to advance the rights of the "common man" against a "corrupt aristocracy" and to preserve the Union. He was a frontier and married Rachel Donelson Robards. He was a state Supreme Court justice 1798-1804. He purchased a property later known as The Hermitage, and became a wealthy, slave-owning planter. In 1801, he was appointed colonel of the Tennessee militia and elected its commander 1802. He led troops in the 1813-14 Creek War, winning the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. The subsequent Treaty of Fort Jackson required the Creeks to surrender vast lands in present-day Alabama and Georgia. In the concurrent War of 1812 against the British, his victory in 1815 at the Battle of New Orleans made him a national hero. He then led US forces in the First Seminole War which led to the annexation of Florida from Spain and briefly served as Florida's 1st territorial governor before returning to the Senate. He ran for president in 1824 winning a plurality of the popular and electoral vote. As no candidate won an electoral majority, the House of Representatives elected John Qunicy Adams in a contingent election. In reaction to the alleged "corrupt bargain” between Adams and Henry Clay and Adams’ ambitious agenda, Jackson's supporters founded the Democratic Party. He ran again in 1828 defeating Adams in a landslide. Jackson faced the threat of secession by South Carolina over what opponents called the "Tariff of Abominations”, defused when the tariff was amended, and Jackson threatened military force if South Carolina attempted to secede. In Congress, Clay led the effort to reauthorize the Second Bank of the United States. Jackson, regarding the Bank as a corrupt institution, vetoed renewal of its charter. After a lengthy battle, Jackson and his allies thoroughly dismantled the Bank. In 1835, Jackson became the only president to pay off the national debt completely. His presidency marked the beginning of the ascendancy of the party "spoils system” in American politics. In 1830, Jackson signed the Indian removal Act which forcibly relocated most members of the Native American tribes in the South to Indian Territory. In foreign affairs, his administration concluded a "most favored nation" treaty with Great Britain, settled claims of damages against France from the Napoleonic Wars, and recognized the Republic of Texas. In January 1835, he survived the 1st assassination attempt on a sitting president. In retirement, Jackson supported the Van Buren and Polk presidencies and advocated Texas’ annexation, accomplished shortly before his death. 8 x 5 3rd Person ALS, no place, February 24 1825, in total: “Genl Jackson returns his respects to Messieurs Chivers Archer & Hamilton & will do himself the honor to dine with them on Saturday next if Mrs. J’s situation is such that he can leave her.” Mentions of wife Rachel are quite uncommon and indicate his close attention to his wife and her health. Will matt and frame nicely with included small steel engraving portrait of Jackson. RACHEL DONELSON ROBARDS JACKSON (1767-1828) Wife of Andrew Jackson, died days after his election as president and before his 1829 inauguration. With her family, she moved to Tennessee at 12, the Donelsons among the 1st white settlers in Tennessee. A very beautiful young woman, she attracted attention from suitors. Later in life, her country manners and full figure severely contrasted with Jackson's tall, spindly form and genteel manners. First married to Lewis Robards in Nashville ca.1791, her marriage was not a happy one, and they separated in 1790. Believing Robards would file for divorce, she returned to the Donelson family home. When Jackson migrated to Nashville in 1788, he boarded with her mother. She eloped with Jackson to Natchez, Mississippi believing Robards secured a divorce. However, he had not, and her marriage to Jackson was technically bigamous and she was an adulteress. On the grounds of Rachel's abandonment and adultery, Robards was granted a divorce in 1794. At about that time, the legitimacy of the Jackson marriage was questioned because they were married in Spanish-controlled Natchez; as the Jacksons were Protestants, only Catholic marriages were recognized as legal there. After the divorce was finally legalized in 1794, Andrew and Rachel wed again in a quiet ceremony at the Donelson home. She had a close relationship with Jackson, usually anxious while he was away with military or political affairs. Rachel was noted for her deep religious (Presbyterian) piety. They had no biological children, adopting her nephew in 1809 naming him Andrew Jackson Jr. In 1813, the Jacksons adopted a Creek orphan boy they named Lyncoya; he died of tuberculosis in 1828. Around 1817 the Jacksons adopted Andrew Jackson Hutchings, grandson of Rachel's sister. They adopted Rachel’s nephew, Andrew Jackson Donelson who would become Jackson’s White House aide. During the prelude to the 1828 election, she was subjected to horrible attacks from supporters of Jackson's opponent, John Quincy Adams. The campaigns targeted Jackson's "passion and lack of self-control" in 1824 & 1828. One newspaper asked: "Ought a convicted adulteress and her paramour husband to be placed in the highest offices of this free and Christian land?" The attacks and public knowledge of what was considered a very private matter caused Rachel to sink into depression. Adding to her stress, Lyncoya Jackson died at The Hermitage in 1828. Between the scandal, Lyncoya’s death, and a heart condition, she spent much of the 1828 campaign depressed and crying, dying of a heart attack Dec. 22, 1828. Although her maladies began as early as 1825, Jackson always blamed his political enemies for her death: "May God Almighty forgive her murderers," Jackson swore at her funeral, "I never can."

Condition: Good, folds, paper loss at top and left edges, few fold splits and margin tears carefully repaired
Type:Letter






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