Mineo, Sal

Uncommmon signed MGM fan photo bust portrait of the actor, murdered at age 37

Price: $250.00

Description:
Sal Mineo(1939-1976),[2] Film and theater actor best known for his role as John "Plato" Crawford with James Dean in the iconic film, “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955). He was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for that role and for his appearance in “Exodus” (1960. His first stage appearance was in Tennessee Williams’ “The Rose Tattoo” (1951) and he played opposite Yul Brynner in “The King and I”. As a teenager, Mineo appeared on ABC’s 1953-54 musical quiz program “Jukebox Jury”. He made several TV appearances before his film debut in “Six Bridges to Cross” (1955, beating out Clint Eastwood for the role. He was also in “The Private War of Major Benson” (1955) with Charlton Heston. His breakthrough as an actor came in “Rebel Without a Cause” as "Plato" Crawford, the sensitive teenager smitten with Jim Stark (played by James Dean) and his popularity quickly developed. In “Giant” (1956), Mineo played a Mexican boy killed in WW II and he was typecast as a troubled teen. By the late 1950s, he was a major celebrity, known as the "Switchblade Kid" from his role as a criminal in the 1956 movie “Crime in the Streets”. He recorded some songs and an album. Two singles reached the Top 40 in the US Billboard Hot 100; “Start Movin’ (In My Direction)” reached #9, sold over a million copies and was awarded a gold disc. He starred in the title role in “The Gene Krupa Story” (1959), and appeared as the celebrity guest challenger on a 1957, episode of “What’s My Line?” His acting ability and exotic good looks earned him the role of a Jewish emigrant in Otto Preminger’s “Exodus” (1960), for which he won a Golden Globe and his 2nd Oscar best supporting actor nomination. By the early 1960s, Mineo was becoming too old to play the type of role that made him famous, and rumored homosexuality led to his being considered inappropriate for leading roles. He appeared in “The Longest Day” (1962) and portrayed Uriah in “The Greatest Story Ever Told” (1965). On television, Mineo was on a Season 2 episode of “The Patty Duke show” (1964) and in 3 episodes of the ABC TV series “Combat” in 1966. His role as a stalker in “Who Killed teddy Bear” (1965) found him typecast again--this time as a deranged criminal. One of his last roles was a 1975 guest spot on the TV series “S. W. A. T.” in which he portrayed a cult leader similar to Charles Manson. His last film role was in “Escape from the Planet of the Apes” (1971) as the chimpanzee Dr. Milo. In 1975, Mineo appeared in a “Columbo” episode and in 2 episodes of “Hawaii Five-O” (1968, 1975. In a 1972 interview he discussed his bisexuality. At his death, he was in a relationship with actor Courtney Burr III. On Feb. 12, 1976, Mineo was stabbed to death behind his apartment building in West Hollywood by pizza deliveryman Lionel Ray Williams. 10 x 8 B&W ca. 1971 MGM fan photograph of the youthful actor looking over his left shoulder, signed on his shoulder. MGM back stamps verso.

Condition: Good, slight blue ballpoint pen skipping towards end, light but apparent
Type:Photograph






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Edward N. Bomsey Autographs, Inc.
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Annandale, VA 22003-2516
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