DeMille, Cecil B.

1944 bust portrait ISP of the legendary film director at the prime of his career!

Price: $250.00

Description:
Cecil B. DeMille (1881-1959) Legendary filmmaker, made 70 silent and sound films 1914-58, a founding father of US cinema and the most commercially successful producer-director in film history. He made silent films in every genre. He began as a stage actor in 1900, later writing and directing stage productions, some with Jesse Lasky, then a vaudeville producer. DeMille's 1st film, “The Squaw Man” (1914) was the 1st feature shot in Hollywood. His success led to the founding of Paramount Pictures with Lasky and Adolph Zukor. His 1st biblical epic, “The Ten Commandments” (1923) was a great success and held Paramount’s revenue record for 25 years. In 1927, he directed “The King of Kings”, acclaimed for its sensitivity, reaching 800+ million viewers. “The Sign of the Cross” (1932) was the 1st sound film integrating all aspects of cinematic technique and “Cleopatra” (1934) was his 1st Best Picture Oscar nomination. After 30+ years, DeMille reached the top of his career with “Samson and Delilah” (1949). His 1st Best Director Oscar was for “The Greatest Show on Earth” (1952), which won Best Picture and a Golden Globe for best film drama. His last and most famous film, “The Ten Commandments” (1956), a Best Picture Oscar nominee, is the 7th highest grossing film ever. DeMille received an honorary Oscar for his film contributions. In July 1913 DeMille, Lasky, Sam Goldfish (later Goldwyn), and some East Coast businessmen created the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company. In 1913, DeMille took a train to Flagstaff, Arizona but disliked the light quality there. He continued to Los Angeles and chose Hollywood. He flouted the dictum that a film should run 20 minutes; his 1st film ran 60 minutes. The “Squaw Man” established the Lasky Company. The 1st years of what became Famous Players-Lasky were spent making films nonstop, and after 5 years and 30 hits, he became the US film industry's most successful director. In the silent era, he was renowned for ‘Male and Female” (1914), “Manslaughter” (1921), “The Volga Boatman (1926), and “The Godless Girl” (1928). In 1928, he made a successful transition to sound, and devised a microphone boom, a soundproof camera blimp, and popularized the camera crane. He had a reputation for autocratic behavior on the set, and was adept at directing thousands of “extras", and using spectacular set pieces. DeMille used 3-strip Technicolor in “North West Mounted Police” (1940) and made no further B&W films. He was a celebrity, complete with megaphone, riding crop, and jodhpurs and hosted “Lux Radio Theater” 1936-44. He often appeared in and narrated many of his later films, and introduced “The Ten Commandments” on screen. He was immortalized in “Sunset Boulevard” when Gloria Swanson says: "All right, Mr. DeMille. I'm ready for my close-up"; DeMille plays himself in the film. ISP,9 x 7 b&w half-length portrait of the great director at his prime, signed and inscribed with sentiment in dark area at top left. Typed note affixed to verso from a local radio station to newspapers informing them of DeMille’s being in Washington DC on March 29 (1944).

Condition: Very good
Type:Photograph






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Edward N. Bomsey Autographs, Inc.
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Annandale, VA 22003-2516
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