Keel, Howard

Nice signed photo of the 1950’s MGM musical star, in 1980’s played major role on TV’s “Dallas”

Price: $75.00

Description:
(1919-2004) Actor and singer, most prominently with his bass-baritone voice as the star of some of the most famous MGM film musicals. He also starred in the CBS TV series “Dallas” 1981-91. After his father's death in 1930, Keel and his mother moved to California, and he worked at Douglas Aircraft Co. as a traveling representative. At 20, Keel was overheard singing by his landlady and encouraged to take vocal lessons. In his 1st public performance in the summer of 1941, he played Samuel the Prophet in Handel’s oratorio “Saul”, singing a duet with bass-baritone George London. In 1945, he briefly understudied for John Raitt in “Carousel” before assigned to “Oklahoma!” While in “Oklahoma!” Keel accomplished a feat never repeated on Broadway; he performed the leads in both shows on the same day! In 1947, Keel joined “Oklahoma!” in London, 1st US postwar musical to travel there. On April 30, 1947, the capacity audience (with the future Queen Elizabeth II) demanded 14 encores; he was the toast of London's West End. His film debut was in “The Small Voice” (1948), released in the US as “The Hideout”. Keel went to Hollywood in 1950 to work for MGM, and made his musical film debut in the film version of “Annie Get Your Gun” (1950) with Betty Hutton, establishing Keel as a star. MGM put him opposite Esther Williams in “Pagan Love Song” (1950) which was successful. He had a 3rd hit in a row with the comedy “Three Guys Named Mike.” Even more popular was “Show Boat” (1951) with Kathryn Grayson and Ava Gardner. Warner Bros. borrowed Keel to play Wild Bill Hickock with Doris Day in “Calamity Jane” (1953), another hit. Back at MGM he and Grayson made a 3rd musical together, “Kiss Me Kate” (1953), liked by the public but unprofitable, same with “Rose Marie” (1954). However, “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” (1954) was a huge success and made MGM a $3M+ profit. He and Williams made a 3rd film together, “Jupiter’s Darling” (1955) which lost MGM over $2M, and “Kismet” (1955) also lost over $2M and Keel was released from his contract. His next film was made in Britain, “Floods of Fear” (1959) returning to Hollywood to play in “The Big Fisherman” (1960). In 1959-60 he was in a short-lived Broadway musical, “Saratoga”. He went to Europe to make a low budget war film, “Armored Command” (1961) and, in England, starred in “The Day of the “Triffids” (1962). The 1960s held limited prospects and he did primarily nightclub work, B-Westerns and summer stock. In 1981, after several cameo appearances, Keel joined the cast of the hit TV series “Dallas” permanently as oil baron Clayton Farlow and stayed on until its end in 1991. “Dallas” helped his acting career and renewed his recording career. SP, 10 x 8 handsome MGM 1950's b&w glossy publicity portrait signed later with felt tip pen.

Condition: Very good
Type:Photograph






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