Brennan, Walter

Nice seated portrait inscribed & signed by the 3-time Oscar winner, appeared in over 230 film and TV roles in 5 decade career!

Price: $250.00

Description:
(1894-1974) American actor in 230+ film and TV roles in a 5-decade career, won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar 3 times, one of only 3 men to win 3 Oscars. He performed in vaudeville at 15 and served in France for 2 years during WW I, then was a financial reporter in Boston. Moving to LA in the early 1920s, he lost most of his money in the 1925 real estate slump. He was a Universal extra in 1924, working so for the next 10 years. An early break came when he was in Goldwyn’s “The Wedding Night” (1935) with Gary Cooper. His part was expanded during filming and it resulted in Brennan getting a contract with Goldwyn who mostly loaned Brennan to other studios. He got a decent part in Goldwyn's “Barbary Coast” (1935), a small role in “Seven Keys to Baldpate” (1935) and had a lead in “Three Godfathers” (1936). His breakthrough was in “Come and Get It” (1936), earning his 1st Best Supporting Actor Oscar. Brennan’s 1st lead role was in “Affairs of Cappy Ricks” (1937). He was in DeMille’s “The Buccaneer” (1938), and “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” (1938), etc. Brennan won his 2nd Best Supporting Oscar for “Kentucky” (1938), supported Astaire & Rogers in “The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle” (1939), and was in “Stanley and Livingston” (1939). Frequently playing characters much older than he was, his loss of many teeth in a 1932 accident, rapidly thinning hair, thin build, and unusual vocal intonations all made him seem older than he was. In “Northwest Passage” (1940), he was billed 3rd after Spencer Tracy & Robert Young. One of his best roles was in “The Westerner” (1940) which earned his 3rd Oscar. He was in “Meet John Doe” (1941) and “Sergeant York” (1941, his 4th Oscar nomination). In 1942, he was in “Pride of the Yankees” with Gary Cooper. Brennan appeared in war films and as the “grumpy old man” sidekick as in “To Have and Have Not” (1944) with Bogart and Bacall. He was a villain in “My Darling Clementine” (1946) with Fonda and played John Wayne’s sidekick “Red River” (1948), one of the best films in his career. More westerns in the early 50s followed. He began TV guest appearances in the 50s, and was in the hit series “The Real McCoys” 1957-63, and co-starred with John Wayne and Dean Martin in “Rio Bravo” (1959). For Brennan Productions, he played in MGM's epic “How the West Was Won” (1963). His “Real McCoys” success led to records, with “Old Rivers” and “The Epic ride of John Glenn” on the flip side (1962). "Old Rivers" hit Billboard’s #5, the oldest living person to have a Top 40 hit at the time; at 68, he hit the Top 40 again with “Mama Sang a Song” (1962). He starred again on TV 1964-65 in “The Tycoon” and “The Guns of Will Sonnett” 1967-69. He continued doing films in the 60s and additional TV shows. His last role was in the western “Smoke in the Wind” (1975). ISP, 10 x 8 b&w MGM glossy fan photo seated portrait holding white hat, inscribed with sentiment at top right. Undated but ca. 1950s.

Condition: Very good, very tiny lower right corner loss of no consequence
Type:Photograph






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