Talleyrand-Perigord, Charles-Maurice de

1798 LS by the duplicitous French statesman as Minister of Foreign Relations in the Revolutionary Government, asking the Governor of Guadeloupe to help a noted historian

Price: $875.00

Description:
(1754-1838) French diplomat, aristocrat, laicized bishop, and politician. After theology studies, in 1780 he became Agent-General of the Clergy and represented the Church to the French Crown. Ordained Bishop of Autun in 1789, Talleyrand attended the Estates General of 1789 representing the clergy, and during the Revolution strongly supported the revolutionaries’ anti-clericalism. He helped write the Declaration of the Rights of Man, and proposed the Civil Constitution of the Clergy that nationalized the Church. He resigned as Bishop after Pope Pius VI excommunicated him in 1791; in 1801, Pius VII laicized him. He was Foreign Minister or in diplomatic capacity under Louis XVI, the Revolutionary years, Napoleon, Louis XVIII, and Louis-Philippe. Talleyrand saw a possible political career for Napoleon during the 1796-97 Italian campaigns and they became close allies. In 1797, he became Foreign Minister and was behind the demand for bribes in the “XYZ Affair” which led to the 1798-1800 undeclared naval Quasi-War with the US. Talleyrand expected to be paid for state duties he performed and solicited payments from the American government to open negotiations. He and Napoleon's younger brother Lucien Bonaparte were instrumental in the 18 Brumaire 1799 coup d'état creating the French Consulate and he was made Foreign Minister by Napoleon. The Pope released him from the ban of excommunication in the Concordat of 1801 which also revoked the Civil Constitution of the Clergy. He was Sovereign Prince of Benevento, a former papal fief in so. Italy 1806-15. Talleyrand opposed harsh treatment of Austria in the 1805 Treaty of Pressburg and of Prussia in the 1807 Peace of Tilsit. He resigned as Foreign Minister in 1807 though the Emperor retained him in the Council of State as Vice-Grand Elector of the Empire and he began to accept bribes from Austria and Russia to betray Napoleon's secrets; at the 1808 Congress of Erfurt, he secretly counseled Tsar Alexander. Talleyrand opposed further harsh treatment of Austria in 1809 after the War of the Fifth Coalition and criticized the invasion of Russia in 1812. He was Napoleon's chief diplomat when French military victories brought one European state after another under French hegemony, but mostly he worked for peace to consolidate French gains. He won peace with Austria in the 1801 Treaty of Luneville and with Britain in the 1802 Treaty of Amiens. He could not prevent renewed war in 1803 but by 1805, opposed Napoleon’s wars against Austria, Prussia, and Russia. On 1 April 1814 he led the French Senate in creating a provisional government in Paris, and was elected president. On 2 April the Senate deposed Napoleon; by 11 April it approved the Treaty of Fontainbleau and re-established the Bourbon monarchy with Louis XVIII. Napoleon's 1815 return to France and subsequent defeat was a reversal for his diplomatic victories; the 2nd peace settlement was much less lenient. He played a major role at the 1814-15 Congress of Vienna, negotiating a favorable settlement for France, and played a role in undoing Napoleon's conquests. He resigned in Sept. 1815 and for the next 15 years was "elder statesman”, created Duke of Talleyrand for life. Under Louis-Philippe, he was Ambassador to the UK 1830-34. LS in French (with English translation), (Paris) 4 Thermidor Year 6 (July 22, 1798), signed “Ch. Mau. Talleyrand” as Citizen Minster of Foreign Relations in the Revolutionary Government, to General Desfourneaux. Talleyrand writes: “I have learned, General, that you are on the point of departure from Guadeloupe. I wish to recommend to you Citizen Anquetile, (attached to the office of Foreign Affairs), whose name is so honorably recognized in Europe, and for whom I have the highest regard and warmest attachment. It is gratifying to be able to oblige such a family. I, therefore, trust that you will do everything possible to be of service to his nephews. I feel certain that they will prove to be worthy of your interest. Greetings and fraternity, Ch. Mau. Talleyrand". “Anquetile-recorded” noted at top left. Letter written on a 9 ¼ x 7 sheet of woven paper with "Francais Relations" watermark. With custom blue leather folio with presentation from L’Academie Francaise Des Becs Fins to Mr. Leslie S. Brady, Cultural Attache to the US Embassy. Folder will be shipped for $10 extra shipping charge if desired. LOUIS-PIERRE ANQUETIL (1723-1808) French historian, joined religious community of the Genofevains in 1741, took holy orders and became professor of theology and literature. He later became rector of the seminary at Reims where he published the 3-volume "Civil and Political History of Reims" 1756-57. In 1759, he was appointed prior of the abbey de la Roe in Anjou; he soon became director of the college of Senlis where he composed a history of France in the 16th & 17th centuries, pub. 1767. In 1766, he became curate or prior of Chateau-Renard near Montargis. He also became a member of the Academie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres. At the start of the French Revolution, he moved to the curacy of La Villette near Paris but during the Reign of Terror was imprisoned at St. Lazare where he began his 9 volume summary of world history. On establishment of the National Academy Institute, he was elected a 2nd-class member of the Academy of Moral and Political Science. He was also employed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He is said to have been asked by Napoleon to write his 14-volume "History of France" (1805). The work went through numerous editions and made Anquetil famous, continued by Adolphe Bouillet in 6 more volumes. EDME ETIENNE BORNE DESFORNEAUX (1767-1849) French Army General, joined the French army as a sergeant in 1789 with the Regiment de Conti during the French Revolution. He later rose to Lieutenant Colonel in the 48th Infantry Regt. in Saint-Dominique in 1792. He was Governor of Guadeloupe 1798-99. He was gravely wounded at the Action of 19 February 1801. His many honors service include Commander of the Legion of Honor (1804) and the Order of Saint Louis (1814). In 1811 he became a member of the Corps Legislatif of the First French Empire and was its vice president. He also was a member of the Chamber of Representatives in 1815 during the Hundred Days and briefly returned to command troops during the Bourbon Restoration after which he retired from public life.

Condition: Very good, lower left corner torn not affecting content, expected folds and light wrinkling
Type:Letter






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